Hi! I'm Duane. I'm a writer & photographer living in New York City. Here are samplings of random thoughts & experiences, & things that inspire me. You can find me on Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, or at my Website

So much possibility and mystery in this photo!

So much possibility and mystery in this photo!

Work selfie! My crazy sweater: gnomes being abducted by aliens!

Work selfie! My crazy sweater: gnomes being abducted by aliens!

A writer’s life

A writer’s life

newyorker:

In memory of the Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who died today at 87, a look back at Jon Lee Anderson’s 1999 Profile of the writer: http://nyr.kr/QrWlKv

What a loss. You will be missed!

newyorker:

In memory of the Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who died today at 87, a look back at Jon Lee Anderson’s 1999 Profile of the writer: http://nyr.kr/QrWlKv

What a loss. You will be missed!

Written and Produced for CBS Radio News:

A controversial NYPD unit, which spied on Muslims at work, in school, and in mosques, is disbanded. CBS News Writer Duane Tollison talks to Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU), about the program and what’s next:

Our Most Popular Stories of the Month

mentalflossr:

1. 10 Rejection Letters Sent to Famous People

2. Adorably Perplexed Kids React to Rotary Phones

3. Which Country Reads the Most?

4. How Chicago’s Neighborhoods Got Their Names

5. 11 French Travel Tips for Visiting America

6. 10 Famous Actors Who Have a Less-Famous Twin

7. 12 Common Dreams and What They Supposedly Mean

8. 12 Simpsons Easter Eggs You Might Have Missed

9. 11 Dog Breeds That No Longer Exist

10. 20 Mysterious Facts About Our Feline Friends

Amazing!

This is Keith Benson. He’s from Bristol, and he loves Chinese food. 

Benson is back in New York for the second time. He comes because his son, Rob, lives here with his (American) wife, Rachel. They live in Queens. Keith is retired and so traverses the ocean to see his expat offspring. That, or be consigned to seeing each other via Skype, or when Rob can afford to visit. 

It’s 7:15 p.m. on Saturday night and he’s crowded into a small area in the front of Han Dynasty—one of the most popular Chinese restaurants in the city—where patrons wait for up to an hour for a table. He stands with his son and daughter-in-law, Michael and I, and a throng of other people, jostling, failing at patience—in a city known for anything but—also on the waiting list. Outside it’s raining. Benson is relaxed. He’s ushered to another waiting area, which a hallway, lined with chairs, leading to the bathroom. He moves each time a person walks past, and again when they leave. And he waits longer. Still, he’s cool. 

Through it all, Benson doesn’t seem to mind much. In fact, he doesn’t seem to mind much, much at all. He’s an easy-go-lucky kind of guy, quick with a chuckle, some banter, and a good-natured jab if you leave yourself open to it. He is down for whatever. He sits mostly quiet, wide-eyed, soaking up everything in sight like a newborn. The only thing bigger than his curiosity—maybe—is his appetite, and in that his love of Chinese food. 

Finally at the table, Benson sits down and devotes his attention to the food, ruminating over every morsel, every bite rolling over his tongue for its full flavor and texture.

Later he’s back in the rain. It’s windy and cold, but he gives no complaints. Soon he’s rewarded, sipping whiskey at the Brandy Library, telling stories of misguided youth and listening intently, without judging, at stories of our own ill-advised endeavors. He stares off. “What are you looking at?” He faces me. “Well now, I’m looking at ugly, aren’t I?” I’ve been had. We laugh. He’s quick for a good ribbing. 

Soon, it’s back in rain and cold, and then a crowded subway ride. Still not one foul word about any of it.  

Benson proves himself to be a good guy and easy companion. I’m sad to see him leave.

This is Keith Benson. He’s from Bristol, and he loves Chinese food. 

Benson is back in New York for the second time. He comes because his son, Rob, lives here with his (American) wife, Rachel. They live in Queens. Keith is retired and so traverses the ocean to see his expat offspring. That, or be consigned to seeing each other via Skype, or when Rob can afford to visit. 

It’s 7:15 p.m. on Saturday night and he’s crowded into a small area in the front of Han Dynasty—one of the most popular Chinese restaurants in the city—where patrons wait for up to an hour for a table. He stands with his son and daughter-in-law, Michael and I, and a throng of other people, jostling, failing at patience—in a city known for anything but—also on the waiting list. Outside it’s raining. Benson is relaxed. He’s ushered to another waiting area, which a hallway, lined with chairs, leading to the bathroom. He moves each time a person walks past, and again when they leave. And he waits longer. Still, he’s cool. 

Through it all, Benson doesn’t seem to mind much. In fact, he doesn’t seem to mind much, much at all. He’s an easy-go-lucky kind of guy, quick with a chuckle, some banter, and a good-natured jab if you leave yourself open to it. He is down for whatever. He sits mostly quiet, wide-eyed, soaking up everything in sight like a newborn. The only thing bigger than his curiosity—maybe—is his appetite, and in that his love of Chinese food. 

Finally at the table, Benson sits down and devotes his attention to the food, ruminating over every morsel, every bite rolling over his tongue for its full flavor and texture.

Later he’s back in the rain. It’s windy and cold, but he gives no complaints. Soon he’s rewarded, sipping whiskey at the Brandy Library, telling stories of misguided youth and listening intently, without judging, at stories of our own ill-advised endeavors. He stares off. “What are you looking at?” He faces me. “Well now, I’m looking at ugly, aren’t I?” I’ve been had. We laugh. He’s quick for a good ribbing. 

Soon, it’s back in rain and cold, and then a crowded subway ride. Still not one foul word about any of it.  

Benson proves himself to be a good guy and easy companion. I’m sad to see him leave.

newsweek:

This week, military veterans finally received a better crack at getting jobs. High unemployment for veterans has been a perennial problem, for everyone from those who fought in the Gulf War to those who were recently in Afghanistan. 

The veterans’ unemployment rate has been dropping, but many are still frustrated as the Guardian explored in a recent package of stories about misunderstood veterans in the job hunt, job tips for them, and the financial snake-oil salesmen who lie in wait for them. 

There were 733,000 veterans without jobs in 2013, though the unemployment rate varied by state, “ranging from over 10% in Michigan and New Jersey to under 4% in Delaware, Iowa, North Dakota, Vermont and Virginia,” according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest measures, which were released in March. 

The government has been working on solutions. This week, the Labor Department put into effect new guidelines that required federal contractors – companies that do business with the government – to make veterans around 8% of their workforce and disabled workers around 7% of their employees. 

Those companies that do business with the government, known as federal contractors, include some of the biggest names in business, including Boeing, Dell, General Electric, AT&T, UPS and Pfizer among thousands of others.

 The Guardian’s package prompted a veteran to describe his extensive job hunt and the lessons he learned from it. Because he cannot speak publicly without endangering his current job, he asked to remain anonymous. We share his impressions here in the belief that they can help other veterans – and their families – understand civilian life and the job hunt. 

Job hunting for veterans: ‘My resume went into a black hole’ | theguardian.com

This is great news!! And a very smart solution!

newsweek:

This week, military veterans finally received a better crack at getting jobs. High unemployment for veterans has been a perennial problem, for everyone from those who fought in the Gulf War to those who were recently in Afghanistan.

The veterans’ unemployment rate has been dropping, but many are still frustrated as the Guardian explored in a recent package of stories about misunderstood veterans in the job hunt, job tips for them, and the financial snake-oil salesmen who lie in wait for them.

There were 733,000 veterans without jobs in 2013, though the unemployment rate varied by state, “ranging from over 10% in Michigan and New Jersey to under 4% in Delaware, Iowa, North Dakota, Vermont and Virginia,” according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest measures, which were released in March.

The government has been working on solutions. This week, the Labor Department put into effect new guidelines that required federal contractors – companies that do business with the government – to make veterans around 8% of their workforce and disabled workers around 7% of their employees.

Those companies that do business with the government, known as federal contractors, include some of the biggest names in business, including Boeing, Dell, General Electric, AT&T, UPS and Pfizer among thousands of others.

The Guardian’s package prompted a veteran to describe his extensive job hunt and the lessons he learned from it. Because he cannot speak publicly without endangering his current job, he asked to remain anonymous. We share his impressions here in the belief that they can help other veterans – and their families – understand civilian life and the job hunt.

Job hunting for veterans: ‘My resume went into a black hole’ | theguardian.com

This is great news!! And a very smart solution!

theparisreview:

“If we write about human beings, in the most humanly way we are able to, I think everybody will understand us. I find humanity as one family. People really are very much the same in their reactions, in their feelings. I know the whole world. I can’t find much difference in the way men react to others’ unhappiness, disasters, tragedies, happiness. Writing for one man, you write for everybody.”

Listen to Ryszard Kapuściński on the art of travel writing.

Interesting!